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Communications

 

New study identifies possible early warning signs of Huntington’s disease

Early warning signs of Huntington’s disease have been uncovered in a sheep carrying the human disease-causing genetic variant, providing new insights into this devastating illness, a new study in Scientific Reports has found.

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Opinion: How years of IMF prescriptions have hurt West African health systems

International Monetary Fund policies can have a real impact on people – and don’t always yield positive results. Writing for The Conversation, Thomas Stubbs (University of Cambridge) and Alexander E. Kentikelenis, (University of Oxford) explore the impact its policies have made on health in West Africa.

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Newly discovered planets could have water on their surfaces

An international team of astronomers has found a system of seven potentially habitable planets orbiting a star 39 light years away three of which could have water on their surfaces raising the possibility they could host life. Using ground and space telescopes, the team identified the planets as they passed in front of the...

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Database protecting UK expats from Brexit ‘misinformation’ to be built by Cambridge researchers

Urgent requirement for channels of timely and reliable information to be developed targeting UK-born people living on the continent, say researchers – before life-changing decisions get made rashly in a milieu of rumour and speculation.

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Cambridge celebrates ‘long-standing and deep-rooted’ relationship with India

Today, as part of UK-India Year of Culture 2017, the University of Cambridge launches a year-long celebration of its ties with India, which stretch back 150 years.

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Carol Ibe: Making training for African researchers affordable

Do you have to choose between an academic career and activism? Gates Cambridge Scholar Carol Ibe is one of an increasing number of students are choosing to keep a foot in both camps.

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Cocaine addiction leads to build-up of iron in brain

Cocaine addiction may affect how the body processes iron, leading to a build-up of the mineral in the brain, according to new research from the University of Cambridge. The study, published today in Translational Psychiatry , raises hopes that there may be a biomarker – a biological measure of addiction – that could be...

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Multiplier effect: the African PhD students who will grow African research

Taskeen Adam and Richmond Juvenile Ehwi are part of a PhD programme that’s enrolling five African students per year for five years, to help train world-class researchers for Africa.

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Opinion: Population versus targeted – which approach is best for preventing heart disease?

Should screening for heart disease be universal or targeted to those at greatest risk? Ellie Paige (Department of Public Health and Primary Care) weighs up the evidence for The Conversation.

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Mapping the family tree of stars

Astronomers are borrowing principles applied in biology and archaeology to build a family tree of the stars in the galaxy. By studying chemical signatures found in the stars, they are piecing together these evolutionary trees looking at how the stars formed and how they are connected to each other. The signatures act as a...

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