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Communications

 

World War II bombing associated with resilience, not ‘German Angst’

Experiencing traumatic events may be associated with greater mental resilience among residents rather than causing widespread angst, suggests a study published this week that investigated the effect of World War II bombing on the mental health of citizens in German cities.

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How to train your drugs: from nanotherapeutics to nanobots

Nanotechnology is creating new opportunities for fighting disease – from delivering drugs in smart packaging to nanobots powered by the world’s tiniest engines.

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Cambridge BRAINFest 2017 kicks off a weekend celebrating the wonders of the brain

Cambridge today (23 June) begins a three-day celebration of the wonders of the brain, with talks, hands-on activities and a ‘secret cinema’ – all part of Cambridge BRAINFest 2017, a free public festival celebrating the most complex organ in the body.

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Computer-designed antibodies target toxins associated with Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have designed antibodies that target the protein deposits in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease, and stop their production.

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Teaching celebrated across the University

Thirteen Cambridge academics have been recognised for their outstanding teaching in the University’s 24th Pilkington Prizes.

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Honorary Degrees 2017

At a ceremony held today in Senate House, the Chancellor awarded Honorary Degrees to eight distinguished individuals in recognition of their achievements in academia, philanthropy and public service

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The bug hunters and the microbiome

Trevor Lawley and Gordon Dougan are bug hunters, albeit not the conventional kind. The bugs they collect are invisible to the naked eye. And even though we’re teeming with them, researchers are only beginning to discover how they keep us healthy – and how we could use these bugs as drugs.

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Family history and location of genetic fault affect risk for carriers of key breast and ovarian cancer genes

A large scale study of women carrying faults in important cancer genes should enable doctors to provide better advice and counselling for treatments and lifestyle changes aimed at reducing this risk.

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Return of the Titan

Cambridge University Botanic Garden is awaiting the Return of the Titan. One of the two Titan Arums held in the Garden’s collection of plants will very soon produce another huge, magnificent flower along with the noxious smell that accompanies it.

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Apollo's mission to drive therapeutic innovation

The stirrings of a revolution are starting to ripple through hundreds of laboratories. It’s a revolution that aims to result in new medicines – faster and with fewer failures – and it’s being led by three UK universities and three global pharmaceutical companies.

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