skip to content

Communications

Our channels

We use a range of media, social media and multimedia channels to talk about our work at the University of Cambridge, including press release, YouTube and our research magazine Research Horizons.

Read more

Working with the media

The Communications Office can help you tell your story, through traditional, social and multimedia. Our guide to Working with the Media will give you an idea of how to get your message across and what to expect when speaking to journalists.

Read more

Branding and templates

We offer guidance on the use of the University's logo, stationery templates for your department, and a range of useful resources.

Read more

About the University of Cambridge

Founded in 1209, the mission of the University of Cambridge is to contribute to society through the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence. To date, 90 affiliates of the University have won a Nobel Prize.

Read more


Latest news

'Selfish brain' wins out when competing with muscle power, study finds

20 October 2017

New research on our internal trade-off when physical and mental performance are put in direct competition has found that cognition takes less of a hit, suggesting more energy is diverted to the brain than body muscle. Researchers say the findings support the ‘selfish brain’ theory of human evolution.

Read full article on cam.ac.uk site

Exhibition highlights the untold story of Nazi victims in the Channel Islands

19 October 2017

The untold stories of slave labourers, political prisoners and Jews who were persecuted during the German occupation of the Channel Islands during the Second World War will be revealed from today at a new exhibition co-curated by Cambridge’s Dr Gilly Carr.

Read full article on cam.ac.uk site

Boy, girl... or intersex? Law and gender

19 October 2017

Boy or girl? This is one of the first questions all new parents are asked. In a small percentage of cases, the answer isn’t straightforward: the child is intersex. In a highly gendered society, how does the law apply to people whose physiology doesn’t fit the binary categories of male and female?

Read full article on cam.ac.uk site

Contact us

  communications@admin.cam.ac.uk

Tel: 01223 332300
Out of hours: 07879 116949