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Ancient faeces reveal parasites described in earliest Greek medical texts

Earliest archaeological evidence of intestinal parasitic worms infecting the ancient inhabitants of Greece confirms descriptions found in writings associated with Hippocrates, the early physician and ‘father of Western medicine’.

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Mistletoe and (a large) wine: seven-fold increase in wine glass size over 300 years

Our Georgian and Victorian ancestors probably celebrated Christmas with more modest wine consumption than we do today – if the size of their wine glasses are anything to go by. Researchers at the University of Cambridge have found that the capacity of wine glasses has increased seven-fold over the past 300 years, and most...

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Presenting facts as ‘consensus’ bridges conservative-liberal divide over climate change

New evidence shows that a ‘social fact’ highlighting expert consensus shifts perceptions across US political spectrum – particularly among highly educated conservatives. Facts that encourage agreement are a promising way of cutting through today’s ‘post-truth’ bluster, say psychologists.

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Industrial Revolution left a damaging psychological ‘imprint’ on today’s populations

Study finds people in areas historically reliant on coal-based industries have more ‘negative’ personality traits. Psychologists suggest this cognitive die may well have been cast at the dawn of the industrial age.

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The Billingford Hutch and the moonwort fern – a medieval mystery solved

A heavy oak chest in the Parker Library (Corpus Christi College) was used to store objects left as collateral for loans of money. Its ironwork features the outline of a plant – but no-one knew why. Now a visitor to the Library may have unravelled the meaning of this decorative motif.

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In praise of openness | Vice-Chancellor's blog

I am very pleased to share the first in a series of regular posts collecting some of my thoughts on our University and its future.

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“All this cancer talk is new to me, but I do know there isn’t a stage five”

Kate Gross was just 36 years old when she died of cancer. Researchers at Cambridge – including her husband – are trying to ensure that others receive their diagnoses early enough to stop their cancer.

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Genetics study adds further evidence that education reduces risk of Alzheimer’s disease

The theory that education protects against Alzheimer’s disease has been given further weight by new research from the University of Cambridge, funded by the European Union. The study is published today in The BMJ .

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Clean energy: experts outline how governments can successfully invest before it’s too late

Researchers distil twenty years of lessons from clean energy funding into six ‘guiding principles’. They argue that governments must eschew constant reinventions and grant scientists greater influence before our “window of opportunity” to avert climate change closes.

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£85 million gift from the Dolby family to transform Cambridge science

The University of Cambridge has received an £85 million gift from the estate of Ray Dolby, founder of Dolby Laboratories and its world-renowned Dolby Noise Reduction, Dolby Surround, and successor audio signal processing technologies, which have revolutionised the audio quality of music, motion pictures, and television...

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